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Is the “White Horse Prophecy” Real?




Joseph Smith is alleged to have uttered a prophecy in 1843 alluding to the four horses in the Book of Revelation. This prophecy has become known as the “White Horse Prophecy”. The prophecy was recorded by two Church members, Edwin Rushton and Theodore Turley approximately 10 years after Joseph’s death. There is no contemporary account that was recorded during the Prophet’s lifetime. Only second-hand accounts of the prophecy recorded years after the Prophet’s death exist.


Members often reference the United States Constitution hanging by a thread during the last days (Especially during a Democratic president’s term). This idea is taken from a supposed quote from this prophecy - “You will see the Constitution of the United States almost destroyed. It will hang like a thread as fine as a silk fiber.” This quote is so common, in fact, that it has been referenced by Brigham Young, Orson Hyde, and other early Church leaders, but it has not been referenced by Church leaders for nearly a decade, unless to state its falseness.



The “White Horse Prophecy” has been used by critics to claim that Latter-day Saints have a secret agenda to take over the United States government. It is even the root for the ridiculous legend that the Washington DC Temple is set up to become the head of the government and houses an exact replica of the White House’s Oval Office in it.


So is the “White Horse Prophecy” for real? Probably not. Authorities of the Church have denounced portions of the account, including President Joseph Fielding Smith in a 1918 General Conference. Joseph F. Smith and Bruce R. McConkie have also stated that the prophecy should not be trusted as fact. The “White Horse Prophecy” in any of its variant forms, has never been submitted, or even considered, for such a process that would be required to make it canon or binding on the Church membership. Basically, the Church's stance is that members should not believe the prophecy.


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